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Fall 2013 Journey to Health Classes

September 11th, 2013

Fall 2013 Journey to Health Classes from Waldo County General Hospital on Vimeo.



Posted in Exercise, In the Community, J2H TV

Ask our provider: how do I prevent ear infections? What do you advise for treatment?

September 11th, 2013

Ask our provider about ear infections from Waldo County General Hospital on Vimeo.



Posted in Healthy Living, J2H TV

Camp Koda goes to the Belfast Farmer’s Market

September 11th, 2013

Camp Koda goes to the Belfast Farmer’s Market from Waldo County General Hospital on Vimeo.



Posted in Healthy Eating, Healthy Living, In the Community, J2H TV

Learn how to live better with heart failure

September 6th, 2013

It’s frightening when a health professional diagnoses you with heart failure. For most people, the words “heart failure” bring on fears of an imminent death. But once you realize the diagnosis doesn’t mean your heart to going to stop beating immediately, you need to learn skills to better manage your condition and you may also want to connect with others who have the same problem.

 

If so, a series of five free classes known as “The Beat Goes On” will be offered by Waldo County General Hospital on Thursdays, except for one Wednesday, from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. beginning Oct. 3. These classes will be held in the second floor conference room at 125 Northport Ave. (the new building across from the hospital).

 

The five classes and the instructors are:

 

•  Thursday, Oct. 3: You can do this: Self-Management Skills for    Living Well with Heart Failure by Lisa Sirois RN;

 

•  Thursday, Oct. 10: Ahhh: Managing the Stress of Heart Failure by   Jo-Ann Whiting RN, the hospital’s case manager;

 

•  Wednesday, Oct. 16, Pump it Up: Exercising with Heart Failure by Teri Mace, physical therapy aid;

 

• Thursday, Oct. 24:  Eating Well with Heart Failure: Get the Low  Down on Salt by Brooke Reed, Registered Dietician; and

 

•  Thursday, Oct. 31:  Pills and Me: Understanding the World of Heart Failure by Nancy Nystrom, a pharmacist at the hospital;

 

While the course is free, space is limited so register early by calling Barbara Crowley at 930-2650 or emailing her at bcrowley@wcgh.org.

 

 

 



Posted in Hospital News, In the Community

Ride for Oncology adds colored ribbons to honor cancer patients

August 28th, 2013

Kristin Aldus, left, of the imaging department at Waldo County General Hospital made the posters with the large ribbons while Sheldon Mitchell of the maintenance department built the easels that the posters rest on. Attendees at the Waldo County Ride for Oncology will have the opportunity to purchase a smaller ribbon, put the name of a loved one on it, and then pin it to one of the posters to ride in honor of, or in memory of, a family member or friend who did or is fighting cancer.

Kristin Aldus, left, of the imaging department at Waldo County General Hospital made the posters with the large ribbons while Sheldon Mitchell of the maintenance department built the easels that the posters rest on. Attendees at the Waldo County Ride for Oncology will have the opportunity to purchase a smaller ribbon, put the name of a loved one on it, and then pin it to one of the posters to ride in honor of, or in memory of, a family member or friend who did or is fighting cancer.

 

 

On Sunday, Sept. 22, motorcyclists will gather at the Waldo County Shrine Club for the 2013 Waldo County Ride for Oncology. It’s a fun event and all proceeds benefit the Oncology Patient Assistance Fund at Waldo County General Hospital.

 

There will be a little extra twist this year as participants will have an opportunity to purchase a ribbon and ride in honor of a family member who is fighting cancer currently or in honor or memory of a loved one who fought it in the past.

 

There will be different color ribbons to represent different types of cancer, including pink for breast cancer, dark blue for colon cancer, orange for leukemia, yellow for bladder cancer, white for lung cancer, teal for ovarian cancer, light blue for prostate cancer, purple for pancreatic cancer, or lavender for all cancers.

 

Ann Hooper, manager for the imaging department at Waldo County General Hospital, and Gary Collins, organizer of the motorcycle ride, came up with the idea after hearing from participants that they wanted a way of honoring their family members who they are riding for.

 

Sheldon Mitchell of the hospital’s maintenance department constructed the easels that the large posters will sit on, while Kristin Aldus of the imaging department made the large ribbons on the posters. The small ribbons will be pinned on the larger ones after the names of those people who are being honored are written on them.

 



Posted in Hospital News, In the Community, Uncategorized

Baby Fair seeks participants

August 28th, 2013

The seventh annual Baby Fair selling new and used items for infants and young children will be held on Saturday, Sept. 28, from 8:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Troy Howard Middle School, 175 Lincolnville Ave., Belfast.

 

This is a great opportunity to clean out your closets and sell baby and children’s items no longer needed in your home. Items can include clothes – up to size 12, toys, books, furniture, etc. No recalled furniture or car seats that have an expired use date can be sold.

 

Crafts people who make baby items may also want to join the Fair.

 

Tables for exhibitors are available to rent at $25. Large clothes racks or displays may be charged an additional fee as space is limited. The fee is non-refundable and must be paid prior to the fair to guarantee a spot. Proceeds from table rental fees benefit the Belfast Public Health Nursing Association. All profit from your sales is yours to keep.

 

Set-up will be from 7 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. and clean-up will be immediately following the event. Last year about 250 people attended the fair. There is an admission fee of $1 for adults, which also benefits the Belfast Public Health Nursing Association.

 

To book a table or for more information, call Lois Dutch of Waldo County General Hospital’s Education Department at 930-6713.



Posted in Hospital News, In the Community

Parkinson’s patients can improve movements, speech at WCGH

August 7th, 2013

Amanda works on some exercises with her father that will help him with movement.

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   Physical Therapist Amanda Curtis has joined Speech Language Pathologist Erica James in looking to improve the quality of life for people with Parkinson’s disease—the second most prevalent neurological disease nationwide, behind Alzheimer’s.

   Erica was certified in 2006 to work with Parkinson’s patients on their speech.

   And this June, Amanda became certified to work with Parkinson’s patients on improving their motor skills.

   Helping someone fight the ravages of Parkinson’s disease is personal for Amanda. She’s been working with her father, Randy, on exercises to combat the stiffness often associated with the disease for the past eight years.

Randy and Amanda Curtis

Randy and Amanda Curtis

But now, she will share what she learned from LSVT BIG with patients at the PT/OT department at Waldo County General Hospital. LSVT BIG is a program for improving motor skills for individuals with Parkinson’s disease and some other neurological conditions. The method was developed following more than 20 years of research funded by the National Institutes of Health.

LSVT BIG, which Amanda also recently started with her father, involves 16 individual sessions, four consecutive days a week for four weeks. Participants are also asked to do daily homework and to continue with the exercises after the sessions end.

LSVT BIG involves a set of exercises that help the patient move “big.” They involve stretching, twisting, and big steps, which help the patient with speed of movement, balance, and ultimately his or her quality of life.

Amanda has two slogans for her patients in the LSVT BIG program: “Use it and improve it” and “Think Big.”

“It’s a mindset we’re trying to change…The world tends to get small for people with Parkinson’s and we’re trying to open it up again,” she explains. “We want them to take big steps through a doorway.”

While Randy Curtis is just starting the LSVT BIG program, he has been following an exercise regime put together by his daughter when he was diagnosed eight years ago. He said doctors at the Lahey Clinic are convinced that exercise is what has kept him moving without the telltale signs of Parkinson’s Disease—a slow gait, rigidity of the upper body and decreased balance.

Randy also takes medication which has stopped the tremors. He swims and bikes almost daily to combat the stiffness he wakes to each morning.

Amanda learned during her certification training that the best results come with patients who are highly motivated and take the program soon after being diagnosed, although she is quick to add that there are gains to be made whenever a person with Parkinson’s takes the program.

For more than six years, Erica has been working with patients through LSVT LOUD to improve their speech. Parkinson’s can result in reduced volume, understandability and facial expressions and often the person talks in a monotone.

Much like LSVT BIG, LSVT LOUD is an intensive 4-week therapy, which is scientifically designed for individuals with Parkinson’s disease. Like its exercise counterpart, it also depends on patients doing homework and keeping up the exercises after finishing the training.

LSVT LOUD is a bit easier for patients who live a distance from Belfast since the program can be done in person once a week and over the computer with a webcam. Charlie Bradford of Southwest Harbor, who took the training, says at first he was a bit intimidated by the computer sessions but quickly forgot he was even on it. “I could hear Erica well,” says Charlie. “It was very pleasant. I was comfortable and more relaxed at home and I could talk louder without bothering anyone. After one session, I forgot it was telemedicine. I was just talking to Erica.”

“I can’t wait to start working with more patients with Parkinson’s disease,” says Amanda. “I’m very excited about it. I think there is a big need in our community. These are life-long exercises that people can do every day in order to keep moving and I know it works.”

Amanda and Erica are also hoping to get a Parkinson’s disease support group going.

If you have Parkinson’s disease or have had a stroke or have multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, or Downs syndrome, talk to your doctor about whether LSVT BIG and LOUD might help you.



Posted in August 2013 InPulse, Hospital News, In the Community

WCGH hires new providers

August 7th, 2013

   Dr. Sidney Block, formerly of Belfast and now living in Northport, is a rheumatologist who has practiced since 1975 in Bangor. He will be practicing at the hospital three days a week beginning in January. Until then, he will continue to practice at his current office at 275 Union St. in Bangor.

 

   A 1967 graduate of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, he is board certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology and is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians and a Master of the American College of Rheumatology, where he has held many national offices and served on many committees. In 2000, Dr. Block was the winner of the Paulding Phelps Award from the American College of Rheumatology, which is awarded to a clinical rheumatologist for outstanding service to patients, community and the practice of medicine.

 

   Dr. Michael Gowesky, board certified by the American Board of Anesthesiology, comes to Waldo County General Hospital from Eastern Maine Medical Center and Pen Bay Medical Center. A 1986 graduate of Hebert School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University in Bethesda, Maryland, he has more than 25 years of experience in anesthesiology and critical care.

 

   Dr. Gowesky served in the Air Force from 1990 to 1995, including a four-year stint as the Anesthesiology Consultant to the European Command Surgeon in Germany. He also served as the chairperson of anesthesiology departments in Biloxi, Mississippi, and Slidell, Louisiana, which meant supervising anesthesiologists, nurse anesthetists and RNs, along with supporting five graduate medical programs.

 

   Susan Butterworth, MSN, FNP, started working in pulmonology with Dr. Andrew Dixon in mid-June. She graduated from theFamily Nurse Practitioner program at Regis College in Weston, Mass. in 1999. After that, she worked at several practices in Massachusetts, including the New England Allergy, Asthma & Primary Care in North Andover, while also serving as adjunct professor at Regis College. In May 2011, she became a primary care provider at Rockport Family Medicine in Rockport, providing urgent and chronic health care to patients of all ages.

 

   In August, Lise Desjardins, FNP-C is scheduled to start practicing with Dr. Karen Miller in the Ear, Nose and Throat office. She graduated from the Nurse Practitioner program at the University of Maine in Orono in 1995. Since then, she has served in many diverse practices and environments. She has experience in family practice, emergent and urgent care, occupational health, pediatric and teen services, reproductive and women’s health, and geriatrics. She has worked in “back country medicine and solo rural practices to inner city indigent care and large urban health maintenance organizations.”

Most recently, she has been employed at Maine General Health in Augusta as an occupational health provider. For 11 years before that she was a primary care provider at the North Haven Medical Center.nbsp;



Posted in August 2013 InPulse, New Staff

Aid had a very good year

August 7th, 2013

Lois Aitken, gift shop treasurer, presented Mark Biscone, Executive Director of Waldo County General Hospital, with two checks for the hospital's annual campaign--$4,500 from the gift shop and $6,000 from the Aid's general treasury.

Lois Aitken, gift shop treasurer, presented Mark Biscone, Executive Director of Waldo County General Hospital, with two checks for the hospital’s annual campaign–$4,500 from the gift shop and $6,000 from the Aid’s general treasury.

 

   Waldo County General Hospital Aid members ended their fiscal year in May with an annual meeting and luncheon at Penobscot Shores. A highlight of the celebration was the awarding of pins for volunteer hours by Teri Young-Hise, Director of Nursing. Total hours of service given to the hospital for the past year are 7,405 hours by 50 volunteers. Twenty-three members were recognized at a new level of volunteer hours ranging from 50 hours to 8,000 hours.

   Wilma Moses of Belfast was singled out as the highest achiever with 8,071 hours in total over her 24 years of volunteering. Many years ago she was asked to help out in the hospital pharmacy by a staff member. She went on to become a licensed pharmacist technician at age 78 and works there one day a week. Wilma also volunteers on events, is a past president of the Aid and is the garden walk chair.

   Special commendation was given to Ed Kelley and Marion Pride who have reached 4,000 hours of service each. Ed volunteers in the mail room and has filled many roles in the Aid. Marion is a past president who joined the Aid over 30 years ago. They each received a pin from WCGH and the U.S. Presidential Lifetime Achievement Award. The lifetime achievement award is presented by the Points of Light Foundation and includes a certificate, enamel pin with an eagle and lettering “The President’s Call to Service Award” and a letter from President Barack Obama. The letter echoes a thought that the hospital extends to all of its volunteers, “Thank you for your devotion to service and for doing all you can to shape a better tomorrow for our great Nation…by addressing the most pressing needs in your community.”

   Lois Aitken, gift shop treasurer, presented Mark Biscone, Executive Director, with two checks for the hospital’s annual campaign—$4,500 from the gift shop and $6,000 from the Aid’s general treasury. The Aid holds many fundraising activities throughout the year including a yard sale, silver tea, auction and gift raffles to benefit the hospital.

   The Hospital Aid was established in 1901 and has 107 members.



Posted in August 2013 InPulse, Hospital News, In the Community

Whitten Scholarship awarded

August 7th, 2013

Dr. Dana Whitten, left, and Dr. Joseph Anderson of Belfast Pediatrics present Killyan Richards with the Dana and Diane Whitten Scholarship.

Dr. Dana Whitten, left, and Dr. Joseph Anderson of Belfast Pediatrics present Killyan Richards with the Dana and Diane Whitten Scholarship.

 

   Killyan Richards of Northport has been awarded the Dana and Diane Whitten Scholarship for 2013. A graduate of Belfast Area High School, Killyan will attend Husson University in the fall to study nursing. Her ultimate goal is to work in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

   The Dana and Diane Whitten Scholarship is a cash prize awarded annually to a graduating senior from Belfast Area High School who has demonstrated a strong commitment to caring for and improving the lives of children.



Posted in August 2013 InPulse, Hospital News, In the Community


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