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Dementia: what is it, how do you get it and can you prevent it?

March 20th, 2013



Posted in General Information, Healthy Living, J2H TV

Protect yourself from scam artists

March 20th, 2013



Posted in General Information, J2H TV

Minimally-invasive hip replacements now easier

March 12th, 2013

   Waldo County General Hospital has purchased a new attachment for an operating room table that will allow Orthopedic Surgeon Owen Nelson MD to do hip replacements in a slightly different way. “It allows me to operate on the hip joint from the front,” he said.

 

   Doesn’t really sound like a big change, does it? But it is.

 

   By going into a patient’s hip from the front, Dr. Nelson will be able to avoid cutting the stronger muscles in the hip that are used for walking, getting out of chairs, and other normal daily activities. The bottom line is the patient should have an easier recovery.

 

arch

 

   Going into the hip from the front is one way of performing a minimally invasive hip replacement. A few years ago, Dr. Nelson did a minimally invasive hip replacement on Dr. Joe Manovola, an emergency room doctor at the hospital. In that case, he went in from the back, which is a much more difficult surgery because the hip socket is located in the front of the body. When he went in from the back, Dr. Nelson said he had to deal with the socket facing away from him.

 

   Still, Dr. Manovola was able to walk up and down the hallways of the hospital with full weight on his hip within less than four hours. Over his objections, he didn’t go home until the next day, but he stopped using his walker on day three; threw away his crutches after two weeks; required little pain medication; and was back to work in three weeks.

 

   Dr. Nelson said going in from the front makes the hip socket more readily accessible. With the new table extension, known as an Arch, he will be able to position the patient’s hip so he can see what he wants to see. Besides making recovery easier, it will also make the surgery easier.   “It is easier and safer with the Arch table,” he said. He fully expects to have patients walking sooner after the surgery.

 

   In fact, the first patient Dr. Nelson used a similar extension with (on loan until the hospital’s arrived) was able to walk a short distance without crutches the day after the surgery. Still, Dr. Nelson said that is not his goal.

 

   “My goal is to get people so they have a hip replacement and get well fast enough so they leave the hospital sooner and do their rehab at home,” he said. “That will make it cost a lot less.”

 

   Dr. Nelson explains the purchase of the Arch table extension, which was expensive, is worth the investment because it will shorten the hospital stay for patients and in most cases allow them to do their rehab at home.These changes, he said, will save money, for Medicaid and Medicare mostly.

 

   He believes all medical providers have a responsibility to do procedures in an expeditious and cost effective way while at the same time making sure their patients are safe and the procedure is effective.

 

   “I’m not going to make a big difference myself but I need to do my part to help keep health costs controlled,” he said.

 

   Dr. Nelson said going into the hip from the front is the evolution of surgical techniques but the table extension was really needed for it to be done routinely. Eventually, Dr. Nelson plans to do all hip replacements on the new table extension but in the beginning there will be some limitations based on the patient’s size. “It is much harder on larger people,” he said. “It can be difficult to see what you are doing.”

 

   Besides the table extension, Dr. Nelson also has an x-ray machine in the operating room. That helps him position the implant in the joint. He is pleased to be able to offer his patients the minimally-invasive hip replacements and the benefits of that, including a shorter hospital stay, faster and easier rehab at home, and usually less pain.



Posted in February 2013 InPulse, Hospital News

Saturday hours now available

March 12th, 2013

Does it sometimes seem like you and your family members always get sick on Friday night or Saturday when your doctor’s office is closed? You consider going to the Emergency Room but it’s not really an emergency. On the other hand, you hate to wait until Monday to see a doctor.

 

That’s not a problem anymore!

Read more…



Posted in February 2013 InPulse, Hospital News

Standing taller after cardiac rehab

March 12th, 2013

Norma Sawyer, 71, of Searsport is a self-described workaholic. In most situations that didn’t serve her particularly well.

 

“Someone has to tell me to stop. In fact, that’s why I started smoking. I would sit down and have a cup of coffee and a cigarette as a break,” she says, adding that she worked mostly factory jobs. “I spent 40 years smoking a pack a day. I quit two and a half years ago.”

 

But, her work ethic served her well in the cardiac rehab program at Waldo County General Hospital.

Read more…



Posted in February 2013 InPulse, Hospital News

5210 Let’s Go Waldo grant received

March 12th, 2013

Mark Biscone, executive director of Waldo County  General Hospital, recently received the third installment in the $150,000 three-year grant for 5210 Let’s Go Waldo. Presenting the check were Andrea Fletcher, program manager for community health improvement, center, and Emily Wolff, 5210 Let’s Go program manager.

Mark Biscone, executive director of Waldo County
General Hospital, recently received the third installment in the $150,000 three-year grant for 5210 Let’s Go Waldo. Presenting the check were Andrea Fletcher, program manager for community health improvement, center, and Emily Wolff, 5210 Let’s Go program manager.



Posted in February 2013 InPulse, Hospital News

Learn to live with congestive heart failure

March 12th, 2013

It’s frightening when a health professional diagnoses you with heart failure. For most people, the words “heart failure” bring on fears of an imminent death. But once you realize the diagnosis doesn’t mean your heart to going to stop beating immediately, you need to learn skills to better manage your condition and you may also want to connect with others who have the same problem.

 

If so, a series of five free classes known as “The Beat Goes On” will be offered by Waldo County General Hospital on Thursdays from 1:30 to 3 p.m. beginning April 25. These classes will be held in the second floor conference room at 125 Northport Ave.(the new green-roofed building across from the hospital).

 

The five classes and the instructors are:

 

It’s frightening when a health professional diagnoses you with heart failure. For most people, the words “heart failure” bring on fears of an imminent death. But once you realize the diagnosis doesn’t mean your heart to going to stop beating immediately, you need to learn skills to better manage your condition and you may also want to connect with others who have the same problem.

 

If so, a series of five free classes known as “The Beat Goes On” will be offered by Waldo County General Hospital on Thursdays from 1:30 to 3 p.m. beginning April 25. These classes will be held in the second floor conference room at 125 Northport Ave.(the new green-roofed building across from the hospital).

 

The five classes and the instructors are:

 

  •  April 25: You can do this: Self-Management Skills for Living Well with Heart Failure by Deb Czuchra, the Nurse Practitioner in the cardiology office;

 

  •  May 2: Ahhh: Managing the Stress of Heart Failure by Jo-Ann Whiting RN, case manager;

 

  •  May 9: Pills and Me: Understanding the World of Heart Failure by Nancy Nystrom, pharmacist;

 

  •  May 16: Eating Well with Heart Failure: Get the Low Down on Salt by Jen Nelson, Registered Dietician; and

 

  •  May 23: Pump it Up: Exercising with Heart Failure by Teri Blackadar RN.

 

While the course is free, space is limited so register early by calling Barbara Crowley at 930-2650 or emailing her at bcrowley@wcgh.org.



Posted in February 2013 InPulse, In the Community

Two local schools receive 5210 grants

March 12th, 2013

Two RSU 20 elementary schools, Stockton Springs and the Edna Drinkwater school in Northport, have received 5210 grants.

 

The grants are designed to help schools meet the 5210 Strategies for Success, including providing non-food rewards, increasing opportunities for physical activity, limiting recreational screen time, and engaging community partners to help support and promote healthy eating and active living.

 

5210_Lets Go Waldo_best

 

Stockton Springs Elementary School was given $995.45. The funds will be used for new equipment and associated games to replace sedentary in-door recess activities, including watching movies, and will be used as non-food rewards. Among the equipment to be purchased are sleds, scooters, hoppity hop jump balls, playground balls, hula hoops, and a golf starter easy pack.

 

Principal Jan Austin said the grant application was geared around what Stockton Springs Elementary School would really like to have, and the answer was to get items to increase physical activity and to work with other groups in the area.

 

The school will partner with the Searsport Golf Course to introduce students to the lifelong activity of golf.

 

Waldo County General Hospital donated pedometers that students and staff can use to track their physical activity during a walking program. “Let’s walk during recess,” said Principal Jan Austin. “We can walk 1,000 steps to start.” Then she suggested that the students create a map of the United States and plot how far they walk each day.

 

The grant also calls for the introduction of a winter carnival to the community and the students had a great time brainstorming about the activities they would like to see at a winter carnival.

 

Northport received a grant of $994.87. Those funds will be used to purchase snow castle kits, a variety of balls, jump ropes, hula hoops, plastic discs and racks for jump ropes and hula hoops.

 

The plan is to increase student and staff physical activity by using the new outdoor equipment in a Drinkwater Elementary Recess Challenge Project. The project is designed to keep students and staff moving during outdoor recess time. There is also an incentive component to the project to earn extra outdoor recess time through a point-based system.

 

Students and staff will track progress with an online check-in form and will work collaboratively to move through the activity levels. A bulletin board in the gym will be used to visually show how they are progressing along the challenge.

 

Last year, grants were received by six schools in RSU 20: Ames, Weymouth, East Belfast, Frankfort, Nickerson and Searsport Elementary.

 

The 5210 program stands for 5 servings of fruits and vegetables per day; no more than 2 hours of recreational screen time per day; at least one hour of physical activity a day; and O sugary drinks.

 



Posted in February 2013 InPulse, In the Community

Parent, baby group forming at hospital

March 12th, 2013

 

crying baby sm

Are you the parent of a child under the age of one? Do you sometimes crave an opportunity to get out of the house and to talk with another adult? Would you like to hear ideas, coping strategies and childcare tips from other parents?

 

Waldo County General Hospital is starting a “New Moms or Dads & Babies” group that will meet the second and fourth Tuesday of each month from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. It’s a free group, with snacks provided, and you are encouraged to bring your baby with you.

 

The group will meet in Suite 103 in the new building across the street from the hospital. For more information, call Shannon Robbins RN at 338-3368.



Posted in February 2013 InPulse, In the Community

New Year’s Baby for 2013

March 12th, 2013

Nathaniel Kunesh made his entrance into the world on Jan. 2 at 8:05 a.m. to become Waldo County General Hospital’s New Years Baby. Tipping the scales at 7 pounds 9 ounces, Nathaniel is the son of Scott and Nida Kunesh of Liberty and the little brother of McKenzie. As the New Years Baby for 2013, Nathaniel and his family were the recipients of a number of special gifts from the hospital.

Nathaniel Kunesh made his entrance into the world on Jan. 2 at 8:05 a.m. to become Waldo County General
Hospital’s New Years Baby. Tipping the scales at 7 pounds 9 ounces, Nathaniel is the son of Scott and Nida Kunesh of Liberty and the little brother of McKenzie. As the New Years Baby for 2013, Nathaniel and his family were the recipients of a number of special gifts from the hospital.



Posted in February 2013 InPulse, In the Community


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