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Garden Walk, raffle raise $2,005 for hospital

August 7th, 2013

The 23rd annual Hospital Aid Garden Walk attracted more than 130 participants and raised $2,005. A homemade coverlet created by Barbara Biscone garnered $187 in a raffle. The quilt was won by Lindsay Moore RN. All proceeds from Aid activities are donated to Waldo County General Hospital.



Posted in August 2013 InPulse, Hospital News, In the Community

Director of Waldo County Home Health and Hospice retires

August 7th, 2013

DSC_5088

Recently, Jill Kulbe, center left, retired as the director of Waldo County Home Health and Hospice. She was presented a gift by Teri Young-Hise, Director of Nursing, center right. They are laughing because in lieu of a more traditional retirement gift, the hospital donated a piece of equipment to make taking a blood sample easier to Home Health and Hospice that Kulbe has wanted for a long time. Looking on are Dr. Dana Whitten and far right, Ann Hooper, Director of Imaging.



Posted in August 2013 InPulse, Hospital News, In the Community

Blue Cheese-Walnut Green Beans

August 2nd, 2013

Ingredients

 

1 pound green beans, trimmed

 

¼ cup water

 

2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil

 

¼ teaspoon salt

 

¼ teaspoon freshly ground pepper

 

1/3 cup crumbled blue cheese

 

1/3 cup toasted chopped walnuts (see tip)

 

Preparation:

  1. Bring green beans and water to a boil in a large skillet. Reduce heat to a simmer, cover and cook until the beans are just ender, 3 minutes. Uncover and continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until the water has evaporated, 3 to 4 minutes more.
  2. Add oil, salt and pepper to the pan and cook, stirring, a minute more. Transfer the beans to a large bowl and toss with blue cheese until well coated. Sprinkle each serving with walnuts.

 

Per serving: 163 calories.

 

Tip: To toast chopped or sliced nuts, stir constantly in a small dry skillet over medium-low heat until fragrant and lightly browned, 2 to 4 minutes.



Posted in Healthy Eating, Recipes

Ask Our Provider: Are Fevers Dangerous?

July 5th, 2013



Posted in Doctor Recommendation, General Information, J2H TV

Healthy and delicious zucchini fritters

July 5th, 2013



Posted in Healthy Eating, J2H TV, Recipes

Parmesan-Squash Cakes

July 3rd, 2013

Ingredients:

 

2 large eggs

 

2/3 cup finely chopped shallots

 

1 tablespoon chopped flat-leaf parsley

 

¼ teaspoon salt

 

¼ teaspoon freshly ground pepper

 

½ cup Parmesan cheese

 

1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

 

Preparation

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees
  2. Beat eggs in a large bowl. Stir in shallots, parsley, salt and pepper. Place shredded squash in the center of a clean kitchen towel; gather up the ends and twist to squeeze out any liquid.* Add the squash and cheese to the bowl; stir to combine.
  3. Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat. Pack a 1/3-cup measuring up with the squash mixture and unmold it into the pan; gently pat it down to form a 3-inch cake. Repeat, making 4 squash cakes. Cook until browned and crispy on the bottom, 3 to 4 minutes. Gently turn the cakes over and transfer the pan to the oven. Bake for 10 minutes. Serve immediately.

Per serving: 130 calories

*Tips: To remove the seeds from summer squash, cut the squash in half lengthwise and scrape out the seeds with a spoon. To shred the squash, use the large-holed side of a box grater. We found that the squash browned up better when we placed it in a colander and let the liquid drain from the squash for several hours.



Posted in Recipes

Hospital’s Garden Walk goes from ponds to ocean

July 1st, 2013

The gazebo at Penobscot Shores provides a shaded seating area near the ocean on the Hospital Aid’s garden walk. (WCGH photo)

The gazebo at Penobscot Shores provides a shaded seating area near the ocean on the Hospital Aid’s garden walk. (WCGH photo)

 

The 23rd annual Garden Walk sponsored by the Hospital Aid of Waldo County General Hospital will be held on Friday, July 12, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., rain or shine. Tickets are $15 each with all proceeds benefiting the hospital. A map is included with the ticket for this self-guided tour.

 

This year’s walk includes six gardens in Belfast and Northport. The gardens can be visited in any order. Aid members volunteer as hosts in each garden and refreshments are served.

The Ladd-Spears garden, at Head of Tide, was created on family property 10 years ago when the house was built. Perennials, vegetables and herbs surround the house, a garden room, pergola and tool shed. There are many seating areas among the natural features of large rocks and pine trees. A circular path of grass and wood chips can be followed to a pond fed by a natural spring for those able to walk on uneven terrain.

 

The garden room at the Ladd-Spears garden provides inside seating for a break on the Waldo County General Hospital Aid’s annual garden walk on Friday, July 12. Tickets are available at the hospital. For more information, call 930-6739.

The garden room at the Ladd-Spears garden provides inside seating for a break on the Waldo County General Hospital Aid’s annual garden walk on Friday, July 12. Tickets are available at the hospital. For more information, call 930-6739.

 

The tour continues in Belfast with the Krueger garden on Durham Street. This in-town garden is full of perennials behind an ornamental fence. Paths surrounding the house lead to a back patio and vegetables grown in cold frames. A rustic garden shed and bird houses add a note of whimsy.

Penobscot Shores, an independent living community, is the next participant of the tour. At the Ocean House, one can view the floral gardens in a circular drive, step inside for a tour of two apartments and have refreshments. A handmade coverlet of floral and bird design fabrics was recently made and donated to the Aid by Barbara Biscone. The quilt will be displayed at the Ocean House where people can buy raffle tickets.

 

Continuing along Shoreland Drive, three families, the Gilbertsons, the Hauswalds and the Barnes families, are displaying their ocean-front cottage gardens. The owners have created small sanctuaries for birds, butterflies and peaceful views of the ocean. The Barnes cottage will be open for an inside tour as well. Between the cottages is a path to the ocean that includes a gazebo with seating. You are welcome to bring a lunch.

 

The two remaining gardens are in Northport on Bayside Road. The Garber/Holland/Scala garden is at the site of a former church. Three resident gardeners have turned the lawn into raised vegetable and flower beds and added fruit trees and bushes. They hope to raise all of their own produce. The backyard has a small pond and chicken coop.

 

The Beiser garden accompanies a newer house built on family land. The house is surrounded by herbs, perennials and pear trees. Raised beds of vegetables are started in the winter under a plastic canopy. Fruit bushes include raspberries, black raspberries and lingonberries. Various compost systems are used in the back. You can walk across the street to see peach and apple trees on family property. A bonus for the more adventuresome is a walk down a dirt road onto a tiered walkway that slopes to the ocean.

Fountain2

 

Tickets for the garden walk are available at Brambles garden shop, Left Bank Books and the Waldo County General Hospital gift shop, all in Belfast, and also in any of the gardens on the day of the walk. Plan to join the hospital volunteers for this affordable family event, which is the Aid’s largest fundraiser of the year. For further information, please call Wilma at 338-2785 or Sandra at 930-6739 or e-mail: sgordon@wcgh.org.

 



Posted in Hospital News, In the Community, Uncategorized

Telegenetics: a new tool in cancer battle

June 14th, 2013

Mary Ann Dyer RN and Sharon Curtis RN are the nurses helping patients through telegenic counseling.

Mary Ann Dyer RN and Sharon Curtis RN are the nurses helping patients through telegenic counseling.

 

Waldo County General Hospital was selected as one of two sites in the state to pilot telegenetic services videoconferencing with Maine Medical Center’s cancer genetic specialists. The service is funded in part by a Maine Cancer Foundation grant awarded to Maine Health. Now in its third month, four Waldo County residents referred by their primary care providers have received cancer telegenetic services.

 

The telegenetic services at  Waldo County General Hospital include all cancers that have genetic risks, such as breast, colon, pancreatic, kidney, melanoma (skin), and others.

 

The Waldo County General Hospital team members include Ann Hooper, the hospital’s Imaging Manager who oversees the program, Kim Lenfestey, the patient navigator, Mary Ann Dyer, RN and Sharon Curtis, RN. The genetic specialists at Maine Medical Center include Amanda Lamb, ScM, a board-certified genetic counselor, and Dr. Susan Miesfeldt, a medical oncologist.

 

Karen Kelley of Searsport was the first person to take advantage of the new telegenetic services at Waldo County General Hospital. On her birthday last December, an abnormality was detected in one of Karen’s breasts. The Friday before Christmas she had a biopsy. When she received a call the next week asking her to come to the hospital, she expected to be told that she had breast cancer. She was correct. Karen feels lucky that her cancer was found early. She had a lumpectomy in January and then 33 sessions of radiation in Brewer. Now she is taking an oral treatment for five years.

 

During her treatments, Karen was able to maintain her counseling practice and her normal activities, including skiing. “I had to keep being Karen,” she explains. “My attitude was that I was going to keep moving forward…I am grateful that I didn’t have many side effects.”

 

Telegenetics was recommended to Karen because of her family history of cancer. Karen’s mother and grandmother both were diagnosed with breast cancer. Karen says it was really interesting to begin genetic counseling. She was asked to fill out a family health history form, including the causes and ages of family members’cancer diagnoses and deaths. “It really opened my eyes about how inclusive cancer can be,” she says. Her grandmother died fighting her second diagnosis; her mother has been cancer-free for seven years.

 

Six years ago, a close relative with a history of breast cancer underwent BRCA1 and 2 genetic testing.  These genes are known to increase the chances of getting breast cancer and other types of cancer. Her relative’s genetic test was negative. Karen still expected she would be diagnosed with breast cancer during her lifetime, because she is convinced that this disease runs in her family.

 

Now there’s another BRCA1 and 2 test, BART, that sometimes catches genetic defects that the original test missed; Karen’s relative will have BART. If this test is positive, Karen says she will also have the testing. She knows that this information will allow her to be proactive in her health. It will also direct her generation and the next to make decisions about genetic counseling and testing and preventive care.

 

If you have been diagnosed with cancer and have a family history of it, talk with your primary care provider about whether genetic counseling might be right for you.

 



Posted in Hospital News, In the Community, June 2013 InPulse

Hospital encouraging Advance Directives

June 14th, 2013

Longtime columnist Ellen Goodman says of her mother, “We talked about everything except one thing: how she wanted to live at the end of her life…

 

In my mom’s last years of life, she was no longer able to decide what she wanted for dinner, let alone what she wanted for medical treatment. So the decisions fell to me. Another bone marrow biopsy? A spinal tap? Pain treatment? Antibiotics? I was faced with cascading decisions for which I was wholly unprepared…
 

The last thing my mom would have wanted was to force me into such bewildering, painful uncertainty about her life and death. I realized only after her death how much easier it would have all been if I heard her voice in my ear as these decisions had to be made…”

 

That experience led Goodman to co-found The Conversation Project, which is designed to help people have “the conversation.”  Eighty-two percent of people say it’s important to put their wishes in writing and yet only 23 percent have actually done it.

 

You may have strong opinions on whether you would want a doctor to hook you up to a breathing machine or insert a feeding tube. Or if your heart stops, you know if you  want to be resuscitated. You know if quality of life is more important to you than the quantity.

 

These are tough, but important, questions. Having a conversation about what matters most to you and your loved ones and then putting your wishes in writing is important. But far too few people do it before it’s too late and their families have to make the tough decisions on their own.

 

Sixty percent of people say that making sure their family is not burdened by tough decisions is “extremely important,” and yet, 56 percent admit that they have not communicated their end-of-life wishes.

 

While it’s important to put your wishes in writing, it’s also critical to designate a health care agent in the event you cannot communicate yourself.

 

Dr. Jim Stevenson talks about a case he had in which a middle-aged man with advanced lung cancer was brought into the emergency room following an accident. The man was unresponsive, but clearly in pain, and it took three or four days to identify a decision maker to determine what the patient would want for life-sustaining treatment.

Dr. Jim Stevenson talks about a case he had in which a middle-aged man with advanced lung cancer was brought into the emergency room following an accident. The man was unresponsive, but clearly in pain, and it took three or four days to identify a decision maker to determine what the patient would want for life-sustaining treatment.

 

Increasing the number of Advance Directives (a document in which you put your wishes in writing and designate a health care agent) executed by individuals 65 years and older is a stated goal for Waldo County General Hospital during 2013. The plan is to accomplish this through the hospital’s employed primary care doctors’ offices and at the five health centers.

 

To help with this goal, the hospital is offering a number of presentations to hospital personnel, Hospital Aid and Hospice volunteers, and the community through a presentation on the local cable station, access at Health Fairs and community classes, and placing Advanced Directive packets at nursing homes, Spectrum Generations, the local Agency on Aging and on the hospital’s website.

 

Dr. David Giansiracusa, who specializes in Hospice Care and palliative medicine, talks to WCGH staff about Advance Directives.

Dr. David Giansiracusa, who specializes in Hospice Care and palliative medicine, talks to WCGH staff about Advance Directives.

 

On April 23, Dr. David Giansiracusa, a physician in Portland, who specializes in Hospice Care and Palliative Medicine, did a presentation on Advance Directives for medical staff and other interested parties at the hospital. He said Advance Directives are important so doctors know what to do when a patient is unable to express his or her wishes. And based on the incident at the Boston Marathon, “everyone is vulnerable to being unable suddenly to express his or her wishes,” he added.

 

Giansiracusa said Advance Directives “prevent a huge amount of suffering,” adding, “It is difficult to care for a patient whose wishes are not known and it creates conflicts within the medical staff and within the family. The family has to live with uncertainty.”

 

He said advance care planning helps the health care agent understand the values and beliefs of the patient, which provides a foundation for making decisions. Advance care planning is “preparing for the in-the-moment medical decisions” that often need to be made, he said.

 

“If you don’t want to do it for yourself, do it for your loved ones,” Giansiracusa said. He said visiting The Conversation Project website is a good way to get the conversation started. And the decisions that are made should be shared with all involved “to decrease confusion and conflict and to provide peace of mind to the patient and his or her family.”

 

He said advance care planning should be a routine part of medical care for a primary care provider. “I think it is equally important as allergies and medications list,” he said, adding he thinks primary care providers should be asking their patients “what type of life would be intolerable.” And there should be notes in the patient’s medical record about the discussion.

 

So no matter what your age, if you are interested in making your wishes known and having them carried out, ask your primary care provider about completing an Advance Directive packet and providing a copy to your doctor, the hospital, with your health care agent, and at your home.



Posted in Hospital News, In the Community, June 2013 InPulse, Uncategorized

Nurse excellence awards given

June 14th, 2013

   The 2013 Nurse and CNA Excellence Awards were handed out during Nurses Week at Waldo County General Hospital. The nurse excellence award was won by Sandra Weagle RN, while Taylor Garcelon took the CNA award.

 

 Sandra Weagle RN won the 2013 Nurse Excellence Award.

Sandra Weagle RN won the 2013 Nurse Excellence Award. Making the presentation was Director of Nursing Teri Young-Hise RN.

 

   Weagle, who works in the Emergency Department, has been with the hospital for 22 years, while Garcelon is in her third year and works on the patient floor.

 

The 2013 CNA Excellence Award winner was Taylor Garcelon CNA.

The 2013 CNA Excellence Award winner was Taylor Garcelon CNA, shown here with Director Nursing Teri Young-Hise RN.

 

   In announcing the 2013 Nurse Excellence Award winner, Director of Nursing Teri Young-Hise RN, said of Weagle: “(She) was nominated by a peer who recognizes her as setting high standards for patient care and professionalism. She is seen as a valued colleague who serves as a good resource for others and as a leader who helps keep the patient flow moving smoothly and calmly…

 

   “She consistently puts the patient’s safety and comfort at the top of her list of priorities. She quickly responds to special needs for equipment or services, such as requesting social work assistance, to meet the patient’s requirements beyond the obvious medical needs…

 

   “She is a steady force in a fast-paced area providing everyone with calm, competent direction,” Young-Hise concluded.

 

   On the nomination form, Weagle’s colleague also wrote: “She not only performs the mandatory year-to-year training within the department of education and skills, but maintains the Advanced Care Certificate recommended. She has obtained and maintained her certification as a CEN (Certified Emergency Nurse) and exceeds even that goal by serving as president of the ENA (Emergency Nurses Association) in a nationwide capacity.”

 

   In making the announcement of the CNA Excellence Award winner, Young-Hise said of Garcelon: “(She) is described as a natural leader with a warm and intuitive approach that immediately puts her patients at ease. She is noted for her strong teamwork and for her collaboration with the nursing staff, consistently keeping them apprised of any changes in vital signs or in the patient’s condition…

 

   “Patient safety and comfort is her mission. She consistently discusses her patients with the nursing team to be sure that their safety and care needs are met,” said Young-Hise.

 

   The nurse, who nominated Garcelon for the award, wrote, “(She) brings her ‘A game’ regardless of what may be happening in her life. I have stood outside a patient’s door donning isolation garb and can hear Taylor inside the room calming a patient, laughing with a patient or settling down a patient…”

 

   Garcelon also serves in various committees at the hospital. She is described as eager to implement new ideas and remains upbeat with change.

 

Finalists for the Nurse Excellence Award were, back row from left, Sandra Weagle RN, Krystal Brouty RN, and Cate Bryant RN. In front are Director of Nursing Teri Young-Hise and finalist Patty Trask RN.

Finalists for the Nurse Excellence Award were, back row from left, Sandra Weagle RN, Krystal Brouty RN, and Cate Bryant RN. In front are Director of Nursing Teri Young-Hise and finalist Patty Trask RN.

 

   The other nominees for the 2013 Nurse Excellence Award were Krystal Brouty RN, who works in the Women and Infant Health Care Unit; Cate Bryant RN, who works in the Intensive Care Unit: and Patty Trask RN, who works on the patient floor.

 

Finalists for the Nurse Excellence Award were, back row from left, Sandra Weagle RN, Krystal Brouty RN, and Cate Bryant RN. In front are Director of Nursing Teri Young-Hise and finalist Patty Trask RN. Nominated for the CNA Excellence Award were, back row from left, Jennifer Larrabee CNA, Taylor Garcelon CNA, Pam Ripley CNA, and Stella Littlefield CNA. In the front row, are Director of Nursing Teri Young-Hise RN, and nominees Diana Hills CNA, and Janice Boetsch CNA.

Nominated for the CNA Excellence Award were, back row from left, Jennifer Larrabee CNA, Taylor Garcelon CNA, Pam Ripley CNA, and Stella Littlefield CNA. In the front row, are Director of Nursing Teri Young-Hise RN, and nominees Diana Hills CNA, and Janice Boetsch CNA.

 

Nominated for the 2013 CNA Excellence Award were Janice Boetsch CNA, and Pam Ripley CNA, who both work on the patient floor; Diana Hills CNA in the procedure room; Jennifer Larrabee CNA in cardiac rehab; and Stella Littlefield CNA in the emergency department.

 

   The criteria for the awards are:

   •  demonstration of leadership at the bedside;

   •  commitment to professional development; and

   •  dedication to high quality, safe patient and family-centered care.

 

   This is the second year that Waldo County General Hospital has made the Nurse and CNA Excellence Awards. The winners last year were Carol Knight, LPN, and Cheryl Lucas, CNA.



Posted in Hospital News, In the Community, June 2013 InPulse, Recognition and awards, Uncategorized


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